Embracing the Grind

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is an odd sport

There is just no way around it. For many people who chose to train it we have just resigned to trying to explain to those around us what Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is.

Even within the martial arts world BJJ stands out. Typically it takes around 10-15 years for the average person to take the journey from white to black belt.

That is 10-15 years of training hard and consistently for around 2-3 times a week. To put it bluntly it is a grind. BJJ is a marathon not a sprint and to make it to the end you must learn to embrace this grind. 

Embracing the Grind | Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is an odd sport; there is just no way around it. For many people who chose to train it we have just resigned to trying to explain to those around us what Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is. Even within the martial arts world BJJ stands out. 1

Jiu-Jitsu is hard.

As we are a grappling based martial art, every movement requires your entire body to work in conjunction. You will be sore after every practice, if you are applying yourself in the manner in which you should be.

You will feel sore in places where you have never felt sore before.

Some members adapt easier to this than others. BJJ attracts all walks of life. Some new members may have higher pain thresholds than others. Our members who wrestled competitively in High-School and College will most likely have higher tolerances than those of us who are training for the first time.

To survive the 10-15 years of work that it takes to get your black belt you have to rewire your brain to enjoy the grind. Learning to embrace pushing yourself and finding ways to enjoy when practices get hard is essential.

Injuries are bound to happen. They are absolutely avoidable if you take the time and put in the work, but over 10-15 years injuries are bound to happen. Cross-training is incredibly important, as BJJ can only do so much for your body. Working out outside of BJJ is incredibly important for injury prevention.

Knowing when to train and when to rest is incredibly important. There is a difference between feeling sore and being on the verge of injury. If you continuously train no matter how poor you are feeling may do more harm than good.

Taking a rest day is very important for surviving through the years of BJJ.